British Essayist Sir Richard

British Essayist Sir Richard-2
Steele, Sir Richard, essayist and dramatist, the son of a lawyer who was private secretary to the Duke of Ormond, was born in Dublin early in 1671.He lost his father when still a child, and at twelve years of age, through the influence of the Duke, was admitted into the Charter-house School, London.

Steele, Sir Richard, essayist and dramatist, the son of a lawyer who was private secretary to the Duke of Ormond, was born in Dublin early in 1671.He lost his father when still a child, and at twelve years of age, through the influence of the Duke, was admitted into the Charter-house School, London.

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In 1701 he astonished his gay companions by the publication of a little book, The Christian Hero, designed to prove that "no principles but those of religion are sufficient to make a great man." The contrast between its precepts and the author's free-and-easy life was too great to escape general notice, and he was subjected to much raillery by his companions.Will you have the survival skills to master our quiz? Sir Richard Steele, 1672–1729, English essayist and playwright, b. After studying at Charterhouse and Oxford, he entered the army in 1694 and rose to the rank of captain by 1700.He had a passion for military life, and greatly to the dismay of his friends, entered the army as a private.As he afterwards expressed it, he thereby "lost the succession to a very good estate in the County of Wexford, in Ireland, from the same humour, which he has preserved ever since, of preferring the state of his mind to that of his fortune." His talents and social qualities were not long in procuring him a commission — first as ensign, then as captain.His first book, a moral tract entitled A year after the death of his first wife in 1706, he married Mary Scurlock, the "dear Prue" of his famous letters.Steele, however, was not made for a domestic life, and much of his time was spent carousing with his companions.Scarcely anything is known concerning his first wife, who died a few months after their marriage.His profusion and generosity dissipated her fortune, and his income of £300 a year as Gazetteer was soon heavily forestalled.Steele was often sorely tried by his irregularities, extravagance, and convivial habits; and although considered by some of his friends stiff and prudish, she was acknowledged by all to be good-hearted, forbearing, and true.She even took to her home and heart Steele's illegitimate daughter, of whose existence, prior to her marriage, she had been ignorant.

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